7 Days to Die | How Many Players In A Server?

7 Days to Die - How Many Players In A Server?

7 Days to Die is a great single-player experience, but comes into its own with multiplayer. Exploring the wasteland with friends and foes alike can be some of the most fun you can have in a zombie RPG. That being said, setting up a server can be a difficult affair. On both PC and consoles, the server system is a bit archaic and can be hard to navigate. This guide will go over what we know about servers in 7 Days to Die as of Alpha 20.6 in 2023.

How Many Players Can Play 7 Days to Die Together?

How Many Players Can Play 7 Days to Die Together?

The default server size for a 7 Days to Die game is eight on PC and four on console. This is the default as of Alpha 20.6, and will be what your server if you host one for yourself. However, more powerful servers, such as those rented from server companies, can hold up to 100 players at a time. Players recommend that personally hosted servers remain around a maximum of 20 people, and that even on rented servers, 32 should be your limit.

While you can have servers with up to 100 players on at a time, this comes with a lot of issues. If you want to keep your server stable, you should likely only have 8 players on at a time. 7 Days to Die is a voxel-based game, and forcing the game to load many different blocks for many different users can cause file corruption. Having additional player slots is handy if you want to save inventories, but having more players on the server at a time can cause legitimate problems if you’re not a server-based company.

However, for adventurous hosts with strong PCs, you can edit the server size. Head to the “ServerMaxPlayerCount” section of the serverconfig file and adjust the value to your choice. This will change the default size.

Console players are not quite as lucky. Console games of 7 Days to Die don’t really have servers. They instead have multiplayer lobbies with four players. Thankfully, work is being put into the console edition that may include larger player counts in the future.

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.