Battlefield 2042 Wingsuit | How to Use

Battlefield 2042 Wingsuit

Mobility is crucial in Battlefield 2042, and flying in the sky can be very handy. Usually, if you want to fly around an area, you’ll need a massive plane or helicopter that can get easily shot down. That’s why the Battlefield 2042 wingsuit can be a handy addition to your collection! How do you get it, and when you have it, how is it used? We can help you answer both of these questions and get you flying in no time at all!

How to Use the Wingsuit in Battlefield 2042

Battlefield 2042 Wingsuit

In order to use your wingsuit in Battlefield 2042, you’ll need to play the specialist Sundance. She’s one of the first specialists, so you’ll have her from the start.

Gain some height and jump from that height to start free falling. While in this state, you’ll get a prompt on the screen to start flying with the wingsuit, which you can guide with your camera and standard movement.

Once you start flying, you’ll be jolted into a third-person perspective. It’s somewhat similar to flying a plane, and the best part about it is that you’re immune to falling damage while using it! When you get close enough to the ground for a crash-landing, Sundance will just do a tactical roll and be all good to go.

This can make the wingsuit a great way to counteract the dangerous tornadoes and natural disasters that can otherwise ruin your day.

The wingsuit is reliant on height, so Sundance should only be brought out when you can get that height. That means she’s good on maps with mountains, access to helicopters, or with tall buildings. Unfortunately, you can’t ascend while in the wingsuit… Unless you feel like challenging a tornado. Which we do not recommend.

Battlefield 2042 is full of Specialists with their own mechanics. However, there are even more tricks and mechanics that are embedded deep into the game! And, a few basic mechanics for FPS games that are not in 2042. If you want some more help, check out some of our other guides!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.