Biomutant Disable Quicktime Events | How to Turn Off

Biomutant Quicktime Events

Biomutant uses quicktime events to enhance the tension of some important scenes. It also uses some events just to explore the environments around you. However, at some point, this system can become quite annoying. And in some scenes, missing just one quicktime event means you’re going right back to the start! Experiment 101 understood that not all players would find this experience fun, and some might even have trouble with the events. That’s why the developers added the ability to turn it off if you really need to, or if you think it’d help you enjoy the game!

How to Disable Quicktime Events in Biomutant

Biomutant Quicktime Events

In order to disable quicktime events in Biomutant, go to Settings, then head to the Accessibility tab. Under Gameplay Settings, look for QTE Auto Complete. Turning this to “on” means that quicktime events will complete themselves during the scene as if you performed them perfectly. This allows players to not worry about getting jump scared by a dodge command; you can just enjoy these awesome cutscenes in peace.

Quicktime events are not overly done in Biomutant, but you will find yourself doing them fairly often. They are needed for prompts, like opening doors with the crowbar or digging for treasure. They’re also used during cutscenes, such as hitting the dodge button when your mutant needs to get out of the way of something.

In cutscenes, the QTEs become tedious; failing one of them usually means restarting from the most recent “safe” point. And you may have to do them more than once or twice in a row, even early on! They give you fair leeway, but if your reflexes are shaky at all, feel free to turn this on. If it makes the game experience better for you, then why deal with it at all?

There aren’t many reasons to keep quicktime events active if you find them annoying. I keep them on because I like digging! Thankfully, you can turn them off or on whenever you want, so you can dig and then switch it on before an annoying cutscene.

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.