Biomutant Rock Pillars | How to Destroy

Biomutant Rock Pillars

As you travel across the desolate region in the northeast of Biomutant, you may come across a new obstacle. The Knupstonies has a series of rock pillars that you can’t destroy with a Klonkfist of any upgrade level. That’s a problem, as there are all sorts of loot and upgrades hidden behind these walls! To say that this can be a bit frustrating is an understatement. Exploring the Knupstonies is so annoying if these loose rocks are left unchecked! So, how do you destroy rock walls?

How to Destroy Rock Pillars in Biomutant

Biomutant Rock Pillars

The Knupstonies rock pillars are destroyed by using the Mjut mount, which is what you need to defeat the Hoof Puff. Complete the Noka quest in the far northeastern part of the map to get access to this mount, and then move towards a rock pillar wall. Hit the melee button to attach a grappling hook to it, and then mash the melee button to pull the wall down. Then, you can get access to all of the goodies behind the pillars!

The rock pillars are not all that common. However, in order to complete the game, and even to enter some dungeons, you’ll need to pull them down. That means the Mjut might be a good first step to exploring the Knupstonies. It’ll be better than having to backtrack for those stupid rock walls!

The Mjut is otherwise a fairly standard mount; no increased movement speed or any super important traits. It just tears down these walls and deals increased damage to the Hoof Puff. You can safely change out from the Mjut after you unlock it, and just bring it back out whenever you see a rock pillar wall that you need to break down.

Biomutant is a world that rewards exploration, though it also rewards returning to areas once you have unlocks. The Mjut is just another example of starting with quests before you explore paying off quite a bit. If you’re loving Biomutant, check out some of our other guides!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.