Castlevania 35th Anniversary Kicks Off With… NFTs?

Castlevania 35th Anniversary

Konami kickstarted the 35th anniversary of the Castlevania franchise today, but it’s been a very controversial opener. Rather than announcing a new game, or even remasters of now-archived titles like Lords of Shadow, instead the company has lumped fans with a range of NFTs. The controversial virtual art always tends to divide audiences, and it’s safe to say it’s not what long-time fans expected.

Castlevania 35th Anniversary NFTs Have Fans Asking WTF

Castlevania 35th Anniversary NFTs have fans asking WTF

Yes, the first announcement in the ongoing Castlevania 35th anniversary celebrations is a range of NFTs. Based on games throughout the franchise’s history, the bespoke pieces feature familiar backdrops and start-up menus as the centerpiece. It’s an exclusive set, however, of just fourteen pieces. Konami will auction these off on January 14, with each one going to the highest bidder.

Perhaps some fans may see the appeal of owning virtual pieces of Castlevania history, many are understandably aggrieved. More disappointing is the fact that so few are available, and it’s in an auction format rather than having hundreds ready to buy. It prices out fans who may not want to spend thousands on NFTs, and paints the picture of a celebration of profit rather than one of fan service.

While NFTs seem to be the latest trend in digital circles, it’s no surprise that most fans aren’t happy. Not only are they a hugely expensive and intangible endeavor, but kickstarting celebrations of such an acclaimed franchise in this way certainly seems like a money-grab.

The only bright side is that there are still nine months until Castlevania‘s “official” anniversary in September. We can only hope that it’ll bring a proper game announcement to offset the negative reception to these NFTs. Yes, it’s the way that virtual spaces appear to be heading, but that doesn’t mean fans will necessarily like it. Fingers crossed for a real Castlevania anniversary celebration in the future, instead of this controversial set of virtual art.

Luke Hinton is a freelance culture journalist living in Cardiff, Wales. He graduated from Cardiff University with a degree in Journalism, Media and Communications, and currently balances his freelancing work with postgraduate studies. He specialises in film, TV and entertainment writing.