Destiny 2 Horror’s Least | How to Get

Destiny 2 Horror's Least - How to Get

You have quite a few options for pulse rifles in Destiny 2. From basic firing weapons to burst options that do Stasis damage, you can find a good weapon for your primary firearm. That being said, despite the half-decade that the game has been around for, some weapons just don’t die out. Horror’s Least is a pulse rifle all the way from Season 4. Even if its a bit simple, the stats all speak for themselves. If you want consistency, damage, and no mechanical headache, this is waiting for your Energy slot. So, let’s get cracking!

How to Get Horror’s Least in Destiny 2

How to Get Horror's Least in Destiny 2

Horror’s Least is a reward from the Nightfall strike called The Corrupted. It drops fairly consistently on GM difficulty, and more rarely on lower difficulties. As this is a Nightfall drop, you will have to wait for The Corrupted to come up on the playlist before you even have a chance to acquire this firearm. This Legendary Pulse Rifle drps rarely during the dungeon and less rarely from Sedia, the Corrupted.

The Corrupted Nightfall Strike comes up every now and then. As the playlist has a weekly rotation, you may be waiting for a short amount of time before you can realistically farm for this puppy. And there will be farming; it is not a guaranteed drop.

If it does drop, you might wonder why it remains so popular. Generally, it’s just a solid all-around weapon with a massive magazine and good reload. This allows it to be useful for consistent damage in PvE and for lowering the health of opponents in mid- to long-range encounters in PvP. For Perks, you’d like to see Hammer-Forged, Extended Mag, Zen Moment, and Outlaw. These will help you keep up the pressure in PvP at a longer range. If your build focuses more on close-ranged encounters, you can consider using Polygonal over Hammer-Forged to get early stability into your volleys.

That being said, this weapon is not overly popular in PvP these days. Other pulse rifles, like the Collective Obligation, have slowly pushed it out of the limelight. You can’t go wrong with it, but it’s not exactly optimal anymore.

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.