Goat Simulator 3 Eviction Notice | How to Solve

Goat Simulator 3 Eviction Notice - How to Solve

Goat Simulator 3 offers all of tongue-and-cheek antics that the original had, but now with a spiffy new coat of paint. Because it shares a lot of similarities to the original, it also shares the strange and unique challenge names from the first game. The Eviction Notice event in Goat Simulator 3 is a puzzle that can be done in the southern-most residence area of the map. However, the challenge offers no real guidelines or rules; just a name. So, how do we clear this event quickly and easily? Let’s find out!

How to Solve Eviction Notice in Goat Simulator 3

How to Solve Eviction Notice in Goat Simulator 3

In order to complete the Eviction Notice event, you will have to find the house with several people protesting the relocation of their house. Swing around the back of the house to find a tow truck. Get in and place the truck’s hook around a part of the house and step on it. This will pull down the house, completing the event.

The event begins once you reach the southernmost question mark on the map, along the major highway. There isn’t too much around, other than the one building that you’re tasked with ruining. The building itself is alongside a dirt road and is a large, yellow structure. This is the only structure that you have to tear down; the rest of the neighborhood can stick around. For now.

The only thing that the event cares about is the house coming down. You don’t need to kill any protesters or clear out any humans from the house area. Simply climb into the big red truck on the side of the building and hit the gas! You can climb in by interacting with the car (Triangle/Y) and then use the hook with the Right Bumper. The event will complete the moment that the house collapses.

This is one of many events in Goat Simulator 3, which reward you with some shiny points and a congratulations Here are a few other guides to this wild game!

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.