GTA 5 | How To Lift A Truck

Truck

GTA 5 is all about living the most authentic gangster lifestyle you can – and if you want to look decked out in a truck, you’ll likely want to lift it. In real life, this not only looks unique but boosts a truck’s off-road ability. It’s a feature that Rockstar toyed within GTA: San Andreas, where you could play with a truck’s suspension to bounce the front back and forth. But does it make a return in their crime behemoth, GTA 5?

How To Lift A Truck in GTA 5

Truck

Sadly, you are unable to lift a truck in GTA 5. If you take a truck to Los Santos Customs seeking a suspension lift, you won’t be able to make changes significant enough to constitute a proper lift.

There are some suspension tweaks you can make, but this will only lower your existing suspension, rather than lifting the truck body higher. As such, those looking for a pimped-out truck are out of luck. However, there are some trucks within GTA 5 that could pass for the lifted aesthetic. Take the Duneloader, which is Trevor’s main car in the game. Its suspension is high enough to pass as lifted, but sadly you can’t increase that any further.

Other trucks in the game seem to be already lifted, too. The Guardian is one such case, as well as the Monster Truck, but these aren’t nimble or quick enough to become your main GTA 5 vehicle. As such, if you want a truck lift, you have to choose between the aesthetic and performance; the game won’t let you have both.

It’s certainly a shame, as a game with such detailed driving and racing mechanics as GTA 5 is undeniably missing out without the ability to lift a truck. Equally, it’s not worth getting your hopes up that Rockstar will introduce the feature any time soon. The game has been out for nearly a decade now. As such, we’ll have to make do with the trucks already in the game.

Luke Hinton

Luke Hinton

Luke Hinton is a freelance culture journalist living in Cardiff, Wales. He graduated from Cardiff University with a degree in Journalism, Media and Communications, and currently balances his freelancing work with postgraduate studies. He specialises in film, TV and entertainment writing.