Halo Infinite First Skull Location | Where to Find

Halo Infinite First Skull

It is tradition for Halo single-player campaigns to have a skull system. Be it cosmetic changes or difficulty adjustments, the skulls are fun to find and even more fun to use. Halo Infinite has not broken this cycle, and you’re expected to find skulls all over again. And you can start finding skulls as early as the first mission! The first skull in Halo Infinite is the perfect starting point to a more chaotic mission experience. If you want to experience the campaign in a new way, we highly recommend it! Let’s find out where it lies.

Where to Find the First Skull in Halo Infinite

Halo Infinite First Skull

In order to get your first skull in Halo Infinite, you must be in the first mission, “Warship Gbraakon.” Head down the corridor on the right side. An elevator will be lifting crates upwards, and you’ll want to jump on the elevator that is the second closest to the end of the corridor. Jump on the box and you’ll get lifted up next to a stationary box. On that box is the Boom skull, which will double the radius of any explosion that occurs while it is activated.

In order to activate the first skull, you’ll need to head to the campaign menu and go into the skulls option for your run. Activate whichever one you prefer and then dive right in! Skulls are as dynamic as difficulty, so you can try whatever you like.

The Boom skull is a two-way street. Both your own and enemy explosions will be larger. While your explosions will clear out more enemies, their explosions will be overwhelming in certain situations. If you want real hell, you can combine this skull with the “Catch” skull. That means the enemies will have more grenades. With a doubled radius for explosives. That might be frustrating as all get-out, but it could also be really fun to clown around with!

Want more from Halo Infinite now that the campaign is fresh? We can help you explore the Halo Ring to your heart’s content!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.