Halo Infinite Stockpile Match | How to Win

Halo Infinite Stockpile Match

The beta for Halo Infinite has been pretty great so far! The game has come far since its original trailer, and the team has put clear love and passion into the current result. And it’s only going to get better from here! One thing that they could definitely improve on are the challenge descriptions, as they are definitely not clear! For instance, what is a Stockpile match in Halo Infinite, and how do you get to one? We can help you figure out that non-clear puzzle!

How to Win a Stockpile Match in Halo Infinite

Halo Infinite Stockpile Match

A Stockpile match is found by randomly rolling in Big Team Battle modes. You’ll have to get Stockpile out of one of the options in that playlist in order to complete the challenge. This game mode is based on small objects called Power Seeds that spawn on the map which, when brought to your base, scores points. You can also steal power seeds from your enemies in order to slow their progress.

Frankly, this is perhaps one of the more head-scratching decisions made by the Infinite team. Having challenges be linked to randomized playlists forces players to play modes that they may not like. Hopefully, this is just part of the beta rather than a full game feature. Even if it doesn’t end up being a short term thing, there’s some good news! If you hate BTB, you can just cycle the challenge out of your challenge options.

Once you get into a Stockpile match, your main goal is to collect your team’s Power Seeds. They’ll be color-coded for your side. Bring them to your goal and you’ll build up a point. This is a fairly Capture the Flag like game mode. However, there are a lot of Power Seeds compared to flags!

Once you learn the maps that Stockpile is on, you’ll find efficient paths to collect seeds – or steel the seeds of the opposing team!


Interested in learning more about Halo Infinite? We can show you around!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.