Minecraft Lectern | How to Make

Minecraft Lectern - How to Make

The lectern is one of countless items you’re able to create in Minecraft. Its uses are numerous, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that crafting it will be a walk in the park. It requires several items used in conjunction, which some may find difficult to find. Worry not, as we’ve got all the details on how to make a Minecraft lectern.

How to Make a Lectern in Minecraft

How to Make a Lectern in Minecraft

To make a lectern in Minecraft, you’ll need a bookshelf already made, and then any four wooden slabs you may have. They can be oak, acacia, or any other type of wood you can get your hands on. Head to your workbench, then place three slabs at the top of the grid, the bookshelf in the middle, and a final slab on bottom. This will allow you to craft the lectern.

The good news is that crafting in Minecraft never gets harder than that. Even better is how few different items you need to craft a lectern: just two, including a pre-built bookshelf. Those are pretty straightforward to craft too, requiring any four planks of wood and a book. It’ll means that getting to the lectern is nice and easy, so you can definitely craft one.

Lecterns have a lot of uses in Minecraft, so it’s likely that you’ll want to make one. First and foremost, they’re used to hold books. A lectern can hold one book at a time, but several players can read it at once. On top of that, if a regular villager uses a lectern, they can automatically transfer to the librarian profession. That’ll increase the variety of NPCs in villages, which is always good. Lastly, Minecraft lecterns can be used as a Redstone signal, used in conjunction with Redstone circuits to emit light, send messages, or program to your own desires. Since their uses are so varied, it’s very useful that making a lectern in Minecraft is nice and easy.

Luke Hinton

Luke Hinton

Luke Hinton is a freelance culture journalist living in Cardiff, Wales. He graduated from Cardiff University with a degree in Journalism, Media and Communications, and currently balances his freelancing work with postgraduate studies. He specialises in film, TV and entertainment writing.