Minecraft Panda | How to Tame

Minecrat Panda - How to Tame Panda Passive Pet

There are so many animals to look at in Minecraft. They all have their own behaviors, preferred food, and adorable quirks. So, no doubt you’d love to have all of them as pets! Perhaps the most fluffy and cuddly of the animals in the game are the pandas, which are shown as bamboo-eating and dopey, just like their real-life counterparts. That being said, some animals are just un-tamable in Minecraft. If you can tame a panda, how can you do it? Is there at least a way to keep it safe for as long as possible?

How to Tame a Panda in Minecraft

How to Tame a Panda in Minecraft

Unfortunately, unlike a wolf/dog or ocelot, there is no way to tame a panda inĀ Minecraft to make it your pet. You can use a Name Tag to keep it from despawning, but you cannot use a lead on it. You can lead the panda around with bamboo, and use bamboo to breed with other pandas. Similar to sheep or cows, you’ll want to use a fenced-in area in order to breed pandas, preferably in the same enclosure where you grow your bamboo. Once a panda breeds once, the panda will become passive to you, rather than neutral.

While they are not fighters, you can have pandas in your farm, but be careful! Unlike most animals, pandas need specific things in their enclosure. You need at least eight blocks of bamboo near both pandas, and you need to take your time between feeding both pandas. They don’t like getting fed too close to one another.

Breeding a panda doesn’t really give you too much. They become passive, meaning they won’t attack you if you accidentally hit them. They don’t have any major perks for breeding, though. Baby pandas can sneeze, which very, very rarely drops a slime ball. Killing a panda drops bamboo, but farming bamboo is more efficient. The only reason you’d want to tame a panda is because they’re adorable. And that’s good enough for me!

Something you can get out of it is the Genetics system. Pandas have a major personality: Normal, Lazy, Worried, Playful, Aggressive, Weak, and Brown. You can breed them together to see what new personality comes out. This can be a fun side project, kind of like taming axolotl.

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.