My Time At Sandrock | How to Sandfish

My Time At Sandrock - How to Sandfish

Like many survival games, My Time At Sandrock has a huge variety of different activities to undertake. From resource gathering to farming and everything in-between, the game is already impressively expansive. One of the weirder things that the game offers is the Sandfish mechanic. This allows players to gather the fish in the planet’s desert so you can use them as resources. If you’re wondering how to get these fish so you can make food, we can help you out!

How to Sandfish in My Time At Sandrock

How to Sandfish in My Time At Sandrock

In order to Sandfish in My Time At Sandrock, you must first create a Basic Sandfish Trap at the Worktable. You’ll need to gather Sandworms through gathering, quarrying, or quests to bait your trap, and bring the trap to a fishing spot. These fishing spots are represented by a fishing hook icon on the map, which look like a quicksand pit. Then, you’ll enter a fishing UI, where you select your bait, cast the bait out, and wait to fish.

The Sandfish Trap is a relatively basic creation from Copper, Wood, and Thick Rope. In order to create this trap, you’ll need to begin the “World of Sandfishing” mission from Owen to get the recipe. You’ll make the trap as part of the quest.

Sandfishing is relatively simple. Throw your trap out and interact the moment that you see the bell icon. Then, a circle and a meter will apear. Keep the “fish” sparkle within the circle by using mouse or keyboard movement. Once you’ve done it for long enough, you’ll catch the fish!

Currently, there are only three catches for Sandfishing. Sand Carp is a basic fish which produces a decent meal. Scorpsters are largely the same. Sandacuda are the “elite” version of fish in the early access, and thus is worth significantly more.

There are only two fishing spots so far; one in Paradise Lost, and another in the Wandering Y Ranch. The Wandering Y Ranch is the better one at the moment, as it is the one with Sandacuda spawns. However, it is a bit more distant than the Paradise Lost spawning pool.

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.