Resident Evil Village Wedding Box | Where to Find

Resident Evil Village Wedding Box

While exploring the world – well, exploring the town – of Resident Evil Village, you’ll come across dozens of weird curios and puzzles. From safes to secrets, you’ll have a ton to scratch your head about. Though puzzles aren’t often this game’s forte, the Wedding Box is one of the cooler little puzzles in Resident Evil Village. However, though you might know about it, it takes a bit of getting to before you can interact with it. Especially since you’ve seen it at the beginning of the game! If you’re looking for this neat little thing, we have your back!

Where to Find the Wedding Box in Resident Evil Village

Resident Evil Village Wedding Box

In order to find the Wedding Box in Resident Evil Village, you must reach House Beneviento, which is either the second or third house you enter. To get to the music box, head through the living room, through the doll workshop (doing all of those story events), and then into the storage room. Look for the door that creeks open a bit after you unlock the door with the Silver Key and get the Wedding Ring back, with a code that opens a nearby door. On the table is the Wedding Box, or the Music Box.

It’s hard to miss the music box in the center of the room, since it is critical for the story. You can open it with the Winding Key and get started with the puzzle. You have to line up the scratch marks in the interior of the box. Numerically, the order is:

  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • 2, 4, 1, 5, 3

You’ll know you have it right if the music box plays a song afterwards. Then, you can move right along, new Tweezers in hand!

While this puzzle was interesting… That’s kinda the most expressive that it gets in Resident Evil Village. Oh well! This is an action game at the heart of it, and Ethan certainly brings the action throughout the campaign!


Looking for more secrets, puzzles, and lore about Resident Evil Village? Check out some of our other guides!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.