Stardew Valley Beets | How to Get

Stardew Valley Beets - How to Get

Beets are an earthy root vegetable. The leaves make a great salad, which is perfect for Stardew Valley! More importantly than their flavor, these turnip-adjacent entities can sell for a decent amount, and make for a nice, full garden. While they are far from the most important or powerful crop in the game, beets are still worth farming. If you want this for your own farm, or are wondering if it is even worth investing in, this guide will go over the pros, cons, and delectable flavor!

How to Get Beets in Stardew Valley

How to Get Beets in Stardew Valley

In Stardew Valley, Beets grow from their Seeds, which can be purchased from the Oasis shop in the Desert. They grow after a six day period, and are worth between 100g and 200g. In addition, they can be made into a 225 Juice or a 250 Pickle, if you’re wondering how it works with the Preserves Jar. They can also be crushed into Sugar, and Evelyn absolutely loves them!

These cannot be collected until you get to the Desert. You’ll need to complete the Bus Repair Joja Community Form or complete the Vault Bundles. This’ll unlock the bus, which can bring you to Oasis.

Beets grow best during the Fall season. They’re most commonly used to complete the Remixed Dye Bundle on the Bulletin Board. You’ll need a single one of these to progress towards the Seed Maker, a useful structure. It’s a lot of effort to go to the Oasis to buy seeds for just one little vegetable, though, so you might as well make a killing.

If you want the Beets to be more than roots, you can turn them into Sugar or Vegetable Medley. 1 Beet makes 3 Sugar, making Beets exceptionally useful in a ton of different recipes.

Alternatively, you can just hand your spare beets to Evelyn, who loves them! She’s a recipe machine, so it can be nice to give her some roots for things like cookies or even free Bread!

As a basic crop, you can do worse than Beets. The seeds are boat for 20 and sell for 100. Not the best possible trade in the game, but an acceptable grind if you want Sugar and have some recipes.

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.