Stardew Valley Eel Location | Where to Catch

Stardew Valley Eel Location - Where to Catch

While the idea of catching fish in Stardew Valley might seem like a walk in the park, anyone who has done it knows how much of a headache it can be. From location to spots in the water to even time of day, fish rotate all the time. Knowing exactly where any fish is in this game is a fool’s errand. But, you will have to catch many of them for the community bundles that the game offers. Eels are one of these hard-to-find materials in Stardew Valley. Thankfully, despite the headache, they are consistent and fair once you know where they are.

Where to Catch an Eel in Stardew Valley

Where to Catch an Eel in Stardew Valley

Eels are Ocean fish in Stardew Valley, but they can only be found between 4pm and 2am on the in-game clock during rainy Spring or Fall days. Just fish off the edge of the dock at night while its raining and you’ll have a good chance of finding them. Sadly, it does compete with four other fish at this time. Eels are used for the Night Fishing Bundle and Eel recipes.

As long as you are on the beach when it’s raining, fishing after 4pm – during the Spring or Fall – gives you a chance to get an eel. The better the bait, the easier it’ll be to find.

If you’re frustrated at the weather, you can use Magic Bait to ignore weather restrictions. This bait will allow other fish to spawn as well, so be careful.

You can also rarely find it at the Traveling Cart or in Garbage Cans during its seasons. Not the best farming spot, but hey, an eel’s an eel!

Eels join several other nighttime fish in the Night Fishing bundle. They are also used for specific Eel recipes. Fried Eel gives a bonus to Luck for a short time, but you’ll need to become good friends with George to get that!

Eels aren’t the only weird fish to find in Stardew Valley. Check out some of our other articles on this game’s odd marine life, like Catfish, if you’re looking for more. Or, you can check out our Fishing vs Trapper Profession Guide to know how the money stacks up.

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.