Stardew Valley Loom | Where to Get

Stardew Valley Loom

There are so many different things to craft and do in Stardew Valley. You’re never quite done with your farm, which is a huge part of the allure of the game. If you’ve been wanting to put together some of the most important items on your farm, you’re going to need a little something. The Loom of Stardew Valley is by far the best way to collect Cloth in the game. If you want a consistent source of this high-level good, you’re going to want to unlock this tiny little crafting device. Don’t worry, it’s really easy to find once you know what to do!

Where to Get Loom in Stardew Valley

Stardew Valley Loom

The Loom is a Level 7 Farming recipe in Stardew Valley. Once you reach level 7 in Farming, you can construct a loom with 60 wood, 30 fiber, and one pine tar. This means you’ll need to do a tiny bit of foraging with your farming. However, you’ll be well-rewarded, since Cloth is shockingly important for the mid-game.

The Lom produces Cloth from Wool. The better the Wool, the more cloth you’ll produce! There’s a 10% chance to get 2 Cloth from Silver Quality Wool, 25% from Gold, and 50% from Iridium. Wool’s primary use is to be spun into cloth, so your wool collection isn’t really worthwhile until you’ve gotten this Artisan Equipment on your side!

That being said, you don’t need a Loom to get Cloth, if you’re lacking the farming level. Cloth can be obtained rarely from Mummies, and it can be made from the Recycling Machine when it’s fed a Soggy Newspaper. Finally, you can get one for 3 Aquamarines. That last one’s a pretty bad trade, though!

Cloth is used to make Mills, an important part of any farm. You can also craft a Dressed Spinner, a powerful Fishing Lure (but quite expensive!). Finally, you’ll need Cloth for the Artisan Bundle. So, unless you want to farm Mummies forever, we highly recommend making that loom!


Loving Stardew Valley as much as we do? Check out some of our other guides to this fantastic game!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.