Stardew Valley Red Snapper | Where to Catch

Red Snapper Stardew Valley

Fishing in Stardew Valley is a knowledge game. Finding a specific fish that you need can be an absolute chore, since there are so many variables that you need to consider. And if the weather is uncooperative? Forget it! All of these reasons and more are part of why catching a red snapper in Stardew Valley can be a surprisingly hair-pulling experience. Considering you’ll need a ton of fish for bundles, it’s better to just learn where they are and then work to catch them. If that’s the case, you can learn its location here!

Where to Catch Red Snapper in Stardew Valley

Red Snapper Stardew Valley

In order to catch the red snapper in Stardew Valley, you’ll need to fish in the ocean during a rainy day in the summer or fall. Head to any part of the ocean with a decent fishing skill and cast out between 6 am and 7 pm. If it’s raining out, you will have some chance to catch a red snapper. You can also catch it in the ocean during the winter if you have a Rain Totem, and can be randomly found in garbage cans during the summer, fall, or winter seasons.

Unlike the Chub, the red snapper is significantly less specific. You just need to fish in any area of the beach in order to have your chance to catch the beast. You can fish off of piers or even in the nearby river if you’d like. As long as it’s raining, or with a Rain Totem, you can catch your fish.

The snapper is used almost exclusively for the Ocean Fish Bundle. Since it is required, this is absolutely fine. You can also need it for the Item Delivery or Fishing quests at the Help Wanted Board. These can be worth it. However, you may want to use some bait to improve your efficiency at catching fish.

While the red snapper is technically a winter fish, it still requires rain to spawn — not snow. This is where the Rain Totem comes in. This totem requires high Foraging to craft, or you can rarely find them in Skull Cavern treasure rooms.

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.