Stellaris Jump Drive | How to Use

Stellaris Jump Drive - How to Use

Unsurprisingly in a space empire game, there are plenty of ways to move quickly throughout the star system. Stellaris uses spaceships to move around the galaxy, but these maps are gigantic and are very rigid for travel. If you want to get around in the mid- to late-game, you’re going to need to use FTL. The jump drive and hyper drive are two very good ways to get your ship from one place to another. Jump Drives are much stronger than hyper drives, but suffer from higher crisis chances. If you want to know how to use this to your fullest advantage, we don’t blame you!

How to Use Jump Drive in Stellaris

How to Use Jump Drive in Stellaris

In order to use a Jump Drive in Stellaris, you must first research the technology. This requires your Physics scientists to research Cold Fusion, Antimatter, and Zero point Power before they can roll this rare research. Once you have ships outfitted with Jump Drive systems, select the ships and head to the galaxy view. You’ll see a dotted circle representing your jump radius, and you can initiate a jump using the “Initiate Jump” button on the top bar of your ship’s status tab or by pressing J and clicking on the system within range.

Jump Drives are very difficult to research. This is an endgame tech that allows you to sneak into backlines. Hyper Drives are much simpler, but also suffer from gigantic charge time nerfs that make your ships unable to battle for days. Jump Drives will keep you from fighting at your fullest potential, but they’ll debuff your ships for much less time. They also have a significantly higher Crisis chance.

This technology can be used to attack a difficult flank, but it will require 200 days of recharging before your ships are at the fullest potential. This does not matter for troop carrying ships or utility crews, as it just nerfs your weapon damage and sublight speed. Use it with caution.

Want to know more about Stellaris? Check out our guide to the Clone Army Origin to know if it’s a good start, or our guide to the Engimatic cache to understand this strange popup.

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.