Terraria | How to Make an Anvil

Terraria Anvil

There are a few core crafting tables that you’ll need if you want to go far in Terraria. These can vary from highly cosmetic items like the loom to the immensely useful workbench. However, none are more important for your overall progression than the anvil. This is something you’ll need to make weapons, armor, and keys to dungeons. It is essential to master this recipe every single time you play Terraria. So, let’s learn it now so you’ll never have to again!

How to Make an Anvil in Terraria

Terraria Anvil

In order to make an Anvil in Terraria, you’ll need to gather iron-tier ore. This means you’ll need either 15 Iron Ore or Lead Ore, depending on what your world has generated for you. Smelt them in a Furnace, which you can make from stone, wood, and torches. Finally, bring five Iron or Lead bars to the Work Bench to make yourself an Anvil.

Worlds will either spawn with Iron or Lead. They are essentially the exact same resource, so you should not worry much about them.

Once you have your ores, you’ll need a furnace to smelt it in. Bring 20 Stone Blocks, four Wood, and three Torches to the Work Bench. Put them together to make a furnace. You can then smelt your ore the same way you craft! Open up your inventory and click on the Iron or Lead Bars from the side menu.

Anvils are critical for Terraria, so you should make one quickly. Once you have that down, you can check all sorts of new recipes like armor and weapons. Chain is also important, and should be made early – though, not too many. Make sure you store a bunch of your resources and build an anvil wherever you want to make long-term bases.

Eventually, when you’re in hard mode, you’ll need to get Orichalcum or Mythril Bars. That’s because, after you slay the boss of Hell, you’ll need to upgrade your Anvil to either a Mythril or Orichalcum Anvil. Once again, these are based on what type of world you’ve generated. Then, you can try to make hard mode armor like the Turtle Armor!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.