The Outer Worlds Permanent Concussion | Is It Worth It?

The Outer Worlds Permanent Concussion - Is It Worth It?

The Outer Worlds has plenty of little changes and risks you can take to improve your character. One thing that you really need to consider are flaws. These are optional items that you can take to adjust your character. The Permanent Concussion flaw sounds very scary in The Outer Worlds, but is it worth keeping around? Let’s talk about its pros and cons and why you might just want to accept it.

Is Permanent Concussion Worth It in The Outer Worlds?

Is Permanent Concussion Worth It in The Outer Worlds?

The Permanent Concussion flaw in The Outer Worlds applies a -1 penalty to all of your Mind attributes. In return, you gain one Perk point. In addition, since you have a concussion, you can never receive another concussion again. This makes it an interesting choice in Supernova mode, where it is otherwise quite difficult to heal concussions, and a good idea for melee builds.

Permanent Concussion applies a -1 penalty to Intelligence and Perception. This is a pretty devastating blow to ranged weapons, Dodge, and technical skills like Medical, Science, and Engineering. If your build relies on Long Guns and cares about things like Medical or Lockpick, this might not be the right choice for you. The -1 to both stats is not worth the extra perk point.

However, if your build relies on Strength, Dexterity, Charm, and Temperament, then you should consider it. Melee-centric builds feel some pain from Perception, but not that much. And the perk point you get in return can pump damage quite a lot. For instance, you could theoretically trade 1 Intelligence and Perception for Nietzsche’s Reward and get 5% damage per flaw. Or just raw movement speed!

In addition, if you are on Supernova, you were likely going to have a Concussion most of the time anyways. Crippling your head is pretty easy to do, especially for melee builds. So, getting the perk point for it and never having to worry about crippling your head again might just be handy! However, this is only really recommended for melee-focused builds.

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.