Valheim Fish Wraps | How to Make

Fish Wraps

Valheim has a lot of food options already introduced into the early access. Because of its high stamina bonus, good healing and health, and massive duration, fish wraps a high-tier food item to make consistently. However, they are fairly costly, and actually getting to the point where you can make them requires some progress into the game. You won’t regret making these food items, but there are some ways to make it consistent.

How to Make Fish Wraps in Valheim

Fish Wraps

To make Fish Wraps in Valheim, you need two Cooked Fish and four Barley Flour. To get Cooked Fish, you’ll need to purchase a fishing rod and tackle from the Merchant. Barley Flour requires you to get to the Windmill item and start harvesting barley from the Plains region. Once you can do these consistently, then you’ve got some fish for your diet.

The first step to make yummy fish wraps is, unsurprisingly, the fish. Fishing requires you to locate Haldor and purchase his fishing gear. You’ll need 350 coins, plus ten gold for every 50 pieces of fishing bait. Then, follow our fishing guide! Get your fish cooked on any cooking station, and you have half of your fish wrap.

The “wrap” part requires you to make Barley Flour. Craft the Windmill on the Artisan table using Stone, Wood, and Iron Nails. Place Barley into the Windmill to create Barley Flour, over a fairly reasonable amount of time. It’s a smart idea to build several windmills, since these only function when the wind is blowing… Which can be a scarcity!

Fish Wraps are arguably the best meal in the game. At 60 health and 90 stamina, you’re getting a ton of stats for consuming them. Add in the great health regen and a 40-minute duration, and you’ve got yourself a long-lasting source of food. That makes sense, considering how many fish and how much barely goes into each one. You’re certainly spending a lot of resources on this, but boy is it worthwhile!


Check out some of our other Valheim articles here!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.