Valheim | How to Upgrade the Workbench

upgrade Workbench

So, you may have gotten a fair way through Valheim. Suddenly, some of the high-tier recipes require a higher level Workbench. This might cause a bit of a headache, because the game does not tell you how to upgrade your station right off the bat. There are materials that you need to upgrade it, but you can’t do so directly to the bench. So, how do you upgrade the workbench in Valheim?

How to Upgrade the Workbench in Valheim

upgrade Workbench

To upgrade the workbench in Valheim, you need to place different stations and workplaces near the bench. The four structures that you need are the Chopping Block, the Tanning Rack, the Adze, and the Tool Shelf. Each of these items increases your workbench level by one, allowing you to craft higher level recipes. You will need to have each of these items within two meters of the workbench. If you do it right, you’ll notice a magical line between the upgrade station and your workbench.

The first upgrade for your workbench is the Chopping Block, which requires 10 Wood and 10 Flint. Then, go for the Tanning Rack; it requires 10 Wood, 15 Flint, 20 Leather Scraps, and 5 Deer Hide. After that, the Adze requires 10 Fine Wood and 3 Bronze. Finally, the Tool Shelf requires 4 Iron, 10 Fine Wood, and 4 Obsidian.

These are crafted just like you’d craft furniture or walls: Select the hammer, press F to switch to Crafting, find the item you want to place, and then place it down with a click. As long as it is within two meters of your workbench (which is a relatively small radius), you’ll get the upgrade.

As a side note, duplicates cannot upgrade the workbench multiple times. However, you can upgrade multiple workbenches with the same set of upgrade buildings. This does next to nothing, since the workbench tends to have a huge radius, but might improve your quality of life a touch.


Interested in other ways to get far in your Valheim journey? Our guides will show you the greatest parts of Viking purgatory!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.