Valheim Photo Mode | How to Take Screenshots

photo mode

To say that Valheim is a beautiful game is a bit of an understatement. Rather than using expensive, CPU-draining textures, Iron Gates used incredible lighting techniques to make this game absolutely jaw-dropping. Viking Purgatory is filled to the brim with great moments and even greater lighting. However, it might be hard to find a good screenshot with the UI in the way. So, how do you get to Valheim‘s photo mode? And what options do you have in photo mode?

How to Take Screenshots in Valheim Photo Modephoto mode

To activate Photo Mode, press Ctrl + F3. This will disable the HUD and allow you to take screenshots from your Viking’s perspective, which is currently the only way to get clear shots. This is called Photo Mode, but be careful; you can still get hit and damaged, which would make for hilarious photos, but might not be what you’re looking for.

Ctrl + F3 essentially just removes the HUD, which makes for better photo opportunities. Then you only have the basic camera controls that you have in normal gameplay; zooming in and out, and then turning around the area. Not exactly perfect screenshots, but at least you’re not stuck cropping out the corners…

But is there more that we can do?

We can cheat a bit in order to take better pictures. To enable cheats, press F5 and enter imacheater. You can use this command again to disable cheats, if you feel guilty about it. While in this cheater mode, you can enter the command freefly to take flight into the air. This will allow you to take aerial photos and might get you the angles you’re looking for.

Freefly will disconnect your camera from your avatar, allowing you to look at your environment free from your character’s shoulder. You can also use the command ffsmooth to make your movement a touch better.

Combine freefly and ffsmooth (number) with Ctrl + F3, and you’ve got yourself a wallpaper/background machine!


Want some more Valheim action? Check out some of our other guides!

Jason Toro

Jason Toro

Jason Toro-McCue has committed his schooling to the study of the connection between game design and narrative. When he's not working on this bond through writing articles or guides, he's playing Dungeons & Dragons, or just playing games themselves and looking at the story there.